Spring Omelet of Greens

Spring Omelet of Greens
Recipe Type: Breakfast
Last week I noticed that Blueberry Hill Farm and Wimer’s Organics had beautiful greens – this week North Star Orchard will bring us even more. We really don’t eat enough dark green leafy vegetables, in part, I think, because we think they are hard to use. Not true! Here is an easy way to prepare and store a variety of mixed greens so you’ll have them available for soups, sautés, and even – yes – omelets.
Ingredients
  • Greens
  • Eggs
  • Cheeses
  • Lettuces
  • Spring vegetables
  • Vinaigrette
  • Fresh bread
Instructions
  1. Last week I noticed that Blueberry Hill Farm and Wimer’s Organics had beautiful greens – this week North Star Orchard will bring us even more. We really don’t eat enough dark green leafy vegetables, in part, I think, because we think they are hard to use. Not true! Here is an easy way to prepare and store a variety of mixed greens so you’ll have them available for soups, sautés, and even – yes – omelets.
  2. Walk along the market and buy a number of bundles of difference greens. Kale, spinach, chard, boc choy, broccoli di rapa, even lettuce; it doesn’t matter as long as it’s green and leafy. When you get them home, wash them very carefully (a submersion lettuce spinner is ideal) and then blanch them in a huge tub of boiling water for about a minute. Scoop the greens out and drain in the sink in a colander. You may wish to blanch in several bunches if you have a lot of greens.
  3. When they are drained and cool enough to touch, gently squeeze out the water and chop into large pieces – a one to two inch size is perfect. You will find that your huge pile of greens has collapsed quite a bit and you have a much smaller pile; determine the amount you want to use for tonight’s supper and freeze the rest in baggies. I generally put about a cup of greens in each bag and then I always have some on hand for a quick meal.
  4. For the omelet, figure on about 2-3 eggs per person; beat them very thoroughly just before you put them in the pan. You’ll need eggs (Lindenhof Farm) cheese (Hillacres Pride) and spring onions and herbs (Blueberry Hill, Wimer’s Organics). Grate the cheese and wash and chop the fresh herbs.
  5. The greens can either be used as blanched or sautéed in olive oil or butter before they are put in the omelet. I’d also recommend adding some spring onions to the sauté and at the very last minute, a handful of fresh herbs (parsley, marjoram, etc.) from the market.
  6. Prepare your omelet pan; start it on high heat, add a bit of oil, and add the beaten eggs. Turn the heat down to medium and let the omelet firm up a bit. When it is solid enough to turn, flip it over and, to one side of the egg mix, add some greens, more fresh herbs (if you are so inclined) and some grated cheese. Gently fold the omelet over and cook on low heat until the ingredients are heated through, the cheese is melted, and each side is browned a bit (you’ll flip it once). Scatter some of the cut herbs on top and serve.
  7. For the salad: This is pretty basic; you’ll stroll through the market and buy everything you might want in a salad. In addition to the beautiful spring lettuces and spinach, there are radishes, cucumbers, sugar snap peas (which are also available from Fruitwood Farm), snow peas, small tomatoes, etc. A small handful of each on the salad adds many different high-nutrient vegetables to your dinner. For a salad dressing recipe, check out the August 1, 2007 recipe from last year’s market: https://www.oakmontfarmersmarket.org/recipes.php.
  8. Serve the omelets and salads with a nice fresh hunk of bread from Great Harvest and your dinner is complete. Bon appetit!