CHOCOLATE and BEER TASTING!

Chocolate and Beer Tasting Benefit for HTFMA Education Programs
Sunday March 9th, 2014: 3-5pm

Please join the Haverford Township Farmers Market Association for Benefit Chocolate and Beer Tasting
Featuring Eclat Chocolate and Victory Brewing Company Beers

Sunday March 9th, 2014 from 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Kaya’s Fusion Cuisine (5 Brookline Blvd. Havertown 19083)

Please join Master Chocolatier Christopher Curtin, owner of Éclat Chocolates, and Dr. Marcia Pelchat of Monell Chemical Sciences Center and the University of Pennsylvania, who will lead us through a tasting of locally-made artisanal chocolates from Eclat Chocolate paired with beers from Downingtown’s award-winning microbrewery Victory Brewing Company.

Chris Curtin has won numerous awards for his chocolates, and Eclat was named ‘the best chocolate’ in America by Bon Appétit magazine. Dr. Pelchat is a Physiological Psychologist who specializes in food selection and how the biology of taste determines how we experience wine and food; she will discuss how the flavor profiles of beer and chocolate enhance each other, and provide guidance for your own at-home pairing of beer and dessert. Light appetizers will accompany the tasting.

Reservations are essential as space is limited to just 45 seats, so don’t wait to reserve your spot. Tickets are $40 per person and are going quickly.

Seating is limited, dress is casual and guests must be 21 years or older. Kaya’s is located at 5 Brookline Boulevard (Havertown, PA 19083) near the intersection of Brookline and Darby.

To RSVP, please send an email with your name and the number of reservation spots you require to:
OakmontFarmersMarket@gmail.com

We will confirm your space(s) and write back to you with an address to send your check. When we receive your check we’ll confirm that you are booked into the tasting. You can also send us money via Paypal (go to our website) if you want to be sure of a seat. So act quickly, since we only have 45 seats!

All proceeds benefit the Haverford Township Farmers Market Association’s food and nutrition education programs held at Oakmont Farmers Market, school assemblies and at the Haverford Township Free Library.

Posted in Uncategorized

A Note about Food Prices

I just did an interesting experiment on food prices. While trolling through a series of old ads from the Philadelphia Inquirer I found one from 1951 A&P advertising Thanksgiving turkeys for 73 cents per pound. It caught my eye because that’s far more than the 39 cents per pound the local FreshGrocer is advertising for Thanksgiving turkeys in 2011. I must also assume that to some extent both are loss-leaders for the stores, designed to encourage a lot of other shopping. I track these loss leaders to compare with the prices at the Oakmont Farmers Market, because sometimes the loss leader becomes the “normal” price in the minds of customers, since they don’t realize the store is losing money on the item.

So I decided to find out what .73 translated into in 2011 dollars. I used this calculator: http://www.dollartimes.com/calculators/inflation.htm to arrive at $6.40 per pound in 2011, based on inflation of 3.68%.

On the other side, .39 in 2011 translates into 4 cents per pound in 1951.

WOW. That demonstrates just how much industrial farming has decreased the cost of food over 60 years. Which is good for prices, but as we know, the externals are probably killing us through a variety of routes direct and indirect. Externals include unexamined and overlooked costs such as loss of turkey subspecies biodiversity, environmental costs of CAFOs, moral costs of raising meat in a manner that creates a life that is nasty, brutish and short, etc. It’s not sustainable and nasty to the turkeys.

But it also puts into perspective the value of the turkeys that Axel Linde and his family produce, using methods similar (probably?) to the methods used in 1951. He charges $3.85 a pound for pastured, hormone-and-antibiotic-free birds, almost half the comparable price of the loss-leader of 1951. And the turkeys taste really good.

What a bargain!

-Janet Chrzan

Posted in General Food Info | Tagged

My House Cookies Featured in the Philadelphia Inquirer

One of this year’s vendors at the Oakmont Farmers Market, My House Cookies, owned by Marie and Tom Connell, was featured in The Philadelphia Inquirer yesterday.  Said weekly food columnist Rick Nichols,

“On Parkside Avenue (at 50th, in West Philadelphia) where the bake shop of Marie [Connell]‘s juggernaut – MyHouse Cookies – was going full tilt one day last week, trays of fresh blueberry pies [were] getting baked off for the weekly Oakmont Farmers Market the next afternoon (Wednesday) in Havertown.”

Posted in Market News | Comments Off

Hearty Goulash Soup

Hearty Goulash Soup
Print
Recipe type: Main
Author: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Hearty-Goulash-Soup-11021
It’s cold and dreary and dank – so it must be time for goulash! This lovely, lovely soup can be made with bacon and beef from Lindenhof Farms or Bison from Backyard Bison. I just made it from bison, and heavens it was YUMMY! Serve with a nice crusty loaf of bread and a crisp salad, and a nice glass (or two) of Cotes du Rhone, and you have a meal fit for a Winter Goddess.
Ingredients
  • 5 slices bacon, chopped
  • 3 pounds boneless chuck, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 4 medium onions (about 1 1/2 pounds), chopped fine
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 tablespoons paprika (preferably Hungarian sweet*)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons caraway seeds (note: this may be too much caraway for your taste, it was for mine; try 1/2 teaspoon only and see what you think.)
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup red-wine vinegar
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste
  • 5 cups beef broth
  • 5 cups water
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 red bell peppers, chopped fine
  • 4 large russet (baking) potatoes (about 2 1/2 pounds)
Instructions
  1. In an 8-quart heavy kettle cook bacon over moderate heat, stirring, until crisp and transfer with a slotted spoon to a large bowl. In fat remaining in kettle brown chuck in small batches over high heat, transferring it as browned with slotted spoon to bowl.
  2. Reduce heat to moderate and add oil. Add onions and garlic and cook, stirring, until golden. Stir in paprika, caraway seeds, and flour and cook, stirring, 2 minutes. Whisk in vinegar and tomato paste and cook, whisking, 1 minute. (Mixture will be very thick.) Stir in broth, water, salt, bell peppers, bacon, and chuck and bring to a boil, stirring. Simmer soup, covered, stirring occasionally, 45 minutes.
  3. Peel potatoes and cut into 1/2-inch pieces. Add potatoes to soup and simmer, covered, occasionally until tender, about 30 minutes. Season soup with salt and pepper. Soup may be made 3 days ahead and cooled, uncovered, before chilling, covered. Reheat soup, thinning with water if desired.

 

Posted in Main Dish, Recipes

Recipe: Hearty Goulash Soup

It’s cold and dreary and dank – so it must be time for goulash! This lovely, lovely soup can be made with bacon and beef from Lindenhof Farms or Bison from Backyard Bison. I just made it from bison, and heavens it was YUMMY! Serve with a nice crusty loaf of bread and a crisp salad, and a nice glass (or two) of Cotes du Rhone, and you have a meal fit for a Winter Goddess.

Hearty Goulash Soup
In Austria, warming bowls of goulash soup are served in all kinds of establishments – from quick-service restaurants along the Autobahn to Vienna’s elegant Hotel Bristol. This hearty beef and vegetable soup can be found in many areas of central and eastern Europe, especially in regions that were once part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Our satisfying rendition has chunks of beef and potato plus red peppers, bacon, onions, and garlic, all fragrant with paprika.

Ingredients:
5 slices bacon, chopped
3 pounds boneless chuck, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 medium onions (about 1 1/2 pounds), chopped fine
3 garlic cloves, minced
3 tablespoons paprika (preferably Hungarian sweet*)
1 1/2 teaspoons caraway seeds (note: this may be too much caraway for your taste, it was for mine; try 1/2 teaspoon only and see what you think.)
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup red-wine vinegar
1/4 cup tomato paste
5 cups beef broth
5 cups water
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 red bell peppers, chopped fine
4 large russet (baking) potatoes (about 2 1/2 pounds)

Preparation:
In an 8-quart heavy kettle cook bacon over moderate heat, stirring, until crisp and transfer with a slotted spoon to a large bowl. In fat remaining in kettle brown chuck in small batches over high heat, transferring it as browned with slotted spoon to bowl.
Reduce heat to moderate and add oil. Add onions and garlic and cook, stirring, until golden. Stir in paprika, caraway seeds, and flour and cook, stirring, 2 minutes. Whisk in vinegar and tomato paste and cook, whisking, 1 minute. (Mixture will be very thick.) Stir in broth, water, salt, bell peppers, bacon, and chuck and bring to a boil, stirring. Simmer soup, covered, stirring occasionally, 45 minutes.
Peel potatoes and cut into 1/2-inch pieces. Add potatoes to soup and simmer, covered, occasionally until tender, about 30 minutes. Season soup with salt and pepper. Soup may be made 3 days ahead and cooled, uncovered, before chilling, covered. Reheat soup, thinning with water if desired.

From: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Hearty-Goulash-Soup-11021

Posted in General Food Info | Comments Off